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Writing Tips: 491 - 500

Use your browser's Find function to look for tips that apply to your particular situation.

These tips provided by: http://www.basic-learning.com

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Tip #491: The name of a publication or product is considered singular, even though it may be plural in form.

For example: Consumer Reports is publishing an update on minivans.

These tips go out weekly to over 17,000 subscribers.

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Choose the correct verb:
1. Frosted Flakes (are, is) my favorite cereal.
2. Changing Times (are, is) offering new subscribers a discounted rate.
3. The United States (are, is) undertaking a new foreign policy.
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"Happiness depends upon ourselves." (Aristotle, ancient Greek philosopher)

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Answers:
1. Frosted Flakes (is) my favorite cereal.
2. Changing Times (is) offering new subscribers a discount.
3. The United States (is) undertaking a new foreign policy.



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Tip #492: Who vs. whom.

If you're confused over when to use "who" or "whom" use this trick: substitute the word he/she or him/her and notice
which sounds better. If he or she is correct, then use who. If him or her sounds better, use whom.

Example: Ms. Stevens is the one (who, whom) had the highest sales this quarter.

"Her had the highest sales" doesn't sound correct.
"She had the highest sales" sounds correct, so use who.

Today's tip is going out to 17,091 subscribers.
E-mail marsha@basic-learning to sign up for these tips.

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Choose the correct answer:
1. He appears to be the candidate (who, whom) will win the election.
2. I wonder (who, whom) will make the best department head.
3. With (who, whom) are you traveling?

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Success is dependent upon the glands--sweat glands. Zig Ziglar

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Answers:

1. He appears to be the candidate who will win the election.
2. I wonder who will make the best department head.
3. With whom are you traveling?




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Tip #493: If two people own the same thing, use apostrophe and 's' for the second person only. Example: Jim and Sandy's boss makes their accounting work more pleasurable by offering frequent breaks. If they don't share the same thing, use an apostrophe and 's' for both.

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Choose the correct answer:
1. (Shari , Shari's) and (Leslie, Leslie's) desks have been replaced.
2. (Bob, Bob's) and (Mara, Mara's) walk together was cut short.
3. (Greg, Greg's) and (Jan, Jan's) ride to the 5th floor was done in silence.
See answers below.

Today's tip is going out to over 17,140 subscribers.
E-mail marsha@basic-learning to sign up for these tips.

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Quote of the week:
It is your attitude, not your aptitude, that determines your altitude." Zig Ziglar




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Tip #494: Often, words are spelled differently than they sound. A common example is "would have." Its contraction form "would've"
is often misspelled "would of."

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Choose the correct answer:
1. I (should have, should of) turned off my computer before I left the office.
2. If you want a raise, you (oughta, ought to) get to work on time.
3. He (could of, could have) brought that up at the meeting.

Today's tip is going out to over 17,000 subscribers.
E-mail marsha@basic-learning to sign up for these tips.

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Quote of the week:
Education is the most valuable weapon which you can use to change the world.--Nelson Mandela

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Vocabulary word of the week:
Pundit(n.: a person who gives opinions, usually through the mass media; a critic. Example: We hear from many pundits during the campaign.

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Answers:

1. I should have turned off my computer before I left the office.
2. If you want a raise, you ought to get to work on time.
3. He could have brought that up at the meeting.



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Tip #495: If an entire sentence is an exclamation and the ending words are exact words in quotation, place the exclamation mark after the quotation. Example: I was shocked when my co-worker smugly said, "No way"!

If only the quotation is an exclamation, place the exclamation mark before the quotation marks. Example: I believe she's the person who yelled, "Fire!"

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Choose the correct answer:

1. Donald Trump is famous for his line, ("You're fired"! or "You're fired!")
2. I was devastated when he said, ("Drop dead"! or "Drop dead!")
3. While making my best shot yet, I heard a man yell, ("Fore"! or "Fore!")

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Quote of the week:
Clinging to the past is the problem. Embracing change is the answer. --Gloria Steinem

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Vocabulary word of the week:
Improbable: unlikely to occur or to be true. Example: It's improbable that we will get raises this year.

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Answers:

1. Donald Trump is famous for his line, "You're fired!"
2. I was devastated when he said, "Drop dead"!
3. While making my best shot yet, I heard a man yell, "Fore!"




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Tip #496:

The words explicit and implicit are often confused. Explicit means clearly expressed, while implicit means implied.

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Choose the correct answer:

1. The surgeon gave (explicit, implicit) directions to the nurse.
2. The new manager's (explicit, implicit) comments left us confused.
3. After reading the (explicit, implicit) job description, I realized that I was not yet qualified for a management position.

These weekly tips are sent out to over 17,000 subscribers each week.
Sign up at marsha@basic-learning.com


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Quote of the week:
You can't shake hands with a clenched fist.---Indira Gandhi

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Vocabulary word of the week:
Enigma (n.) something hard to understand; a puzzle or mystery.
Example: It's an enigma why politicians can't agree on more issues.

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Answers:

1. The surgeon gave explicit directions to the nurses.
2. The new manager's implicit comments left us confused.
3. After reading the explicit job description, I realized that I was not yet qualified for a management position.



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Tip #497:

Do not model advertising slogans in your business writing. Some of the slogans may contain improper grammar.


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Correct the following:

1. Got milk? (National Milk Processor Board)
2. You've Got Mail! (AOL)
3. Where You At? (Boost Mobile)

Send us any incorrect ads or signs you notice, and we'll include them in future e-mails.

These weekly tips are sent out to over 17,000 subscribers each week. Sign up at marsha@basic-learning.com

Coming soon! Our website, www. basic-learning.com, is being revamped to make it more attractive and easier for you to
navigate. Stay tuned for news and special offers.

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Quote of the week:

Real integrity is doing the right thing, knowing that nobody's going to know whether you did it or not. – Oprah Winfrey

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Vocabulary word of the week:

Circuitous (adj.): not being forthright or direct in language or action. Example: When I asked my boss why I hadn't received a
raise, she gave me a circuitous response.

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Answers:
1. Do you have milk? or Do you drink milk?
2. You have mail.
3. Where are you?



If you would like to receive the FREE weekly tips by e-mail, contact tips@basic-learning.com and write "Sign Me Up" in the subject line.

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Tip #498:

Although the conjunction "as well as" joins two like items, it does not affect whether the verb is singular or plural. Example: The union official, as well as the workers, agrees to the terms.

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Choose the correct answer:

1. Administrative assistants, as well as supervisors, (is, are) being hired.
2. Mr. Chang, as well as his employees, (is, are) on vacation.
3. The lawyer, as well as his secretary, (is, are) out of the office.

These weekly tips are sent out to over 17,000 subscribers
worldwide each week. Sign up at marsha@basic-learning.com

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Quote of the week:

Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony. --- Mohandas Gandhi

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Vocabulary word of the week:
Juggernaut(n.): a massive force, campaign or object that crushes anything in its path. Example: Our new CEO is a juggernaut, so be careful not to get in his way.

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Answers:

1. Administrative assistants, as well as supervisors, are being hired.
2. Mr. Chang, as well as his employees, is on vacation.
3. The lawyer, as well as his secretary, is out of the office.



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Tip #499:

Correct the following. Answers will vary:
1. Working late.
2. Spending the entire budget by July.
3. Speaking to my co-workers.


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Quote of the week:
Defeat is not the worst of failures. Not to have tried is the true failure. –George E. Woodbury, 1855-1930, U.S. Literary Critic/Poet

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Vocabulary word of the week:
Egregious (adj.) conspicuously or very bad. Example: The news media couldn't wait to report the candidate's egregious error of mispronouncing the prime minister's name.

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Answers will vary. Suggested answers:
1. Working late was not my choice.
2. Spending the entire budget by July created problems.
3. Speaking to my co-workers eased my concerns.



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Tip#500

As a general rule, numbers 1 through 10 may be represented in their numeral form; anything above that should be spelled out in letters. However, when there are two numbers in a sentence and one is 1 through 10 and the other is greater than 10, both numbers should be spelled out.

For example:
There are 3 apples.
There are twenty oranges.
There are three apples and twenty oranges.

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Fill in the blank with the appropriate numerical representation:
1. I went to the parking lot and walked by ________ (5/five) rows of cars before I reached my own.
2. There were _________ (10/ten) photos on the wall and __________ (13/thirteen) original pieces of artwork.
3. The runner sprinted ________ (23/twenty-three) city blocks in
record time.

See answers below.


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Quote of the week:
Use soft words and hard arguments. – English Proverb

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Vocabulary word of the week:
Incredulous (adj.): unwilling or unable to accept what is offered as true.
Example: I saw the incredulous look on his face after he was told the tragic news.

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Answers:
1. I went to the parking lot and walked by 5 rows of cars before I
reached my own.
2. There were ten photos on the wall and thirteen original pieces of
artwork.
3. The runner sprinted twenty-three city blocks in record time.



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