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Writing Tips: 251 - 260

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Books on writing.

Tools to help you include Bull's Eye Business Writing (a self-paced workbook) and How To Improve Your Business Reading Skills (also on CD-ROM)--all from Basic Learning Systems, Inc. 888-204-3600 * See our Web site at http://www.basic-learning.com

Tip # 251:  Clean Up Your Language - Always assume that every e-mail,
no matter how confidential, will be forwarded, and eventually and on
yours boss's desk! Strike any off-color, sexist, profane, or otherwise
objectionable language. Unless you are quoting someone, there is never
a good reason for this in any business communication.

*********************************************************

We are proud to announce that Ohio State University has chosen our
Bull's Eye Business Writing course as a required course for their Ohio
Certified Public Manager Program.  This Program is necessary to become
an accredited member of the National Certified Public Manager
Consortium (CPM).
 
*********************************************************

Please correct the following:

1. If you were I, would you accept the job?
2. The reservation for he and Barbara was made yesterday.
3. Shirley is likely to get a raise as him.
4. Give the results to Jim or to myself.
5. It will be us who win this election.

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise: Correct the following:
1. How will you be effected financially if the effect
   of downsizing means you will lose your job?
2. Harold and Sara were real good friends.
3. None of the coworkers offered his support.
4. The desk and the file cabinet sits in the corner.
5. Mary did good on the test she took yesterday.
*****

Answers:
1. How will you be affected financially if the effect
   of downsizing means you will lose your job?
2. Harold and Sara were really good friends.
3. None of the coworkers offered their support.
4. The desk and the file cabinet sit in the corner.
5. Mary did well on the test she took yesterday.

*********************************************************

"The road to success is always under construction." 
(Lily Tomlin, actor and comedian)




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Tip #252:  To decide whether to use subject or object pronouns after
the words "than" or "as," mentally complete the sentence. 

For example:  "Tom is as smart as she/her."
If we mentally complete the sentence, we would say, "Tom is as smart as she is."  Therefore, "she"
is the correct answer.
 
*********************************************************

We are proud to announce that Ohio State University has chosen our
Bull's Eye Business Writing course as a required course for their Ohio
Certified Public Manager Program.  This Program is necessary to become
an accredited member of the National Certified Public Manager
Consortium (CPM).
 
*********************************************************

Please choose the correct pronoun:

1. He is taller than I/me.
2. Larry would rather talk to her than I/me.
3. In favor of the vote were Jan, Fay, and I/me.
 
*********************************************************

Last week's exercise: Please correct the following:

1. If you were I, would you accept the job?
2. The reservation for he and Barbara was made yesterday.
3. Shirley is likely to get a raise as him.
4. Give the results to Jim or to myself.
5. It will be us who win this election.
******

Answers:
1. If you were me, would you accept the job?
2. The reservation for him and Barbara was made yesterday.
3. Shirley is likely to get a raise as he.
4. Give the results to Jim or to me.
5. It will be we who win this election.
 
*********************************************************

"It takes less time to do a thing right than it does to explain why
you did it wrong." (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)





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Tip #253: Here are some writing tips for those who are preparing a speech:

* Write the main points with bullets
* Keep your notes visually simple
* Space the points so you can read them easily
* Type or write neatly
* Write the sequence of the presentation on a
  separate card
* Highlight important points
* Punch holes in the top left-hand corners of the cards
   and connect them with a ring clip or piece of string

*********************************************************

We are proud to announce that Ohio State Certified Public
Manager Program has chosen our Bull's Eye Business
Writing course as a required course.  This program is
necessary to become an accredited member of the National
Certified Public Manager Consortium (CPM).

*********************************************************

Please correct the following:

1. We need to keep this problem from reoccurring again.
2. The stern warning you delivered did not phase him.
3. Our company used to file all their memos.
4. We need your insurance that the workmen will finish
   by Friday.

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise: Please choose the correct pronoun:
1. He is taller than I/me.
2. Larry would rather talk to her than I/me.
3. In favor of the vote were Jan, Fay, and I/me.
*****

Answers:
1. He is taller than I.
2. Larry would rather talk to her than me.
3. In favor of the vote were Jan, Fay, and I.
******

I enjoyed the remarks of one of my readers, Yossi D.: 

  My mom taught me this week's rule when I was just a
  wee tike. I still use it to try to help others, but
  many people insist on saying "I" when it should be
  "me." I think this is from having "I" hammered into
  our heads as kids when we mistakenly said things like
  "Him and me went to the movies." As a result, many
  people automatically assume "I" is correct whenever
  they aren't certain.

*********************************************************

" You were born an original.  Don't die a copy."  (John Mason)





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Tip #254:  Use these words and phrases to motivate:

  Will you help me?
  Congratulations!
  You were very kind.
  It's been a real pleasure.

*********************************************************
We are proud to announce that Ohio State Certified Public
Manager Program has chosen our Bull's Eye Business
Writing course as a required course.  This program is
necessary to become an accredited member of the National
Certified Public Manager Consortium (CPM).
*********************************************************

Please help Laurie L. with her question: 

"Could you help me with prepositional phrases? My office is stumped as
to whether or not a sentence is grammatically correct if it begins
with a prepositional phrase.   The example we have is, "Due to heavy
rain, the house has flooding in the basement."

I remember being instructed to never begin a sentence with 'due to'. I
feel the sentence should read: "The house has flooding in the basement
due to heavy rains."  Is it correct both ways?

Also, are words and phrases that are accepted in the English language
also grammatically correct? What I mean is that some people in my
office feel that both sentences are acceptable, but they are not both
grammatically correct. Now I'm confused!

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise: Please correct the following:

1. We need to keep this problem from reoccurring again.
2. The stern warning you delivered did not phase him.
3. Our company used to file all their memos.
4. We need your insurance that the workmen will finish
   by Friday.
********

Suggested answers:

1. We need to keep this problem from reoccurring .
2. The warning you delivered did not faze him.
3. Our company filed all their memos.
4. We need your assurance that the workmen will finish
   by Friday.
*******

Suzanne's comments: "I enjoyed reading this week's quiz involving
misused words; it's one of my pet topics, and timely since I've seen
the term "wreck havoc" three times in the past two weeks... once in
the newspaper, once in an online user discussion group, and once in a
business memo.

Until two weeks ago, I had never heard that phrase mangled so. Is the
word "wreak" gone from our language? If folks would stop to think a
moment, they might realize that to "wreck havoc" would be to commit a
tidiness!

*********************************************************

"Personality can open doors, but only character can keep them open."
(Elmer Leterman, business executive)




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Tip #255: Be careful in determining the subject of your sentence, and
make it agree with the verb. 

  Notice the subject is "arrival" and not "friends."

  Wrong:  The arrival of many friends promise good times.
  Right:  The arrival of many friends promises good times.

*********************************************************

What are your thoughts on the following comment? 

Is there a difference between the word "recur" and "reoccur"?

Chris Greene comments:
  I haven't been paying attention, but have people been
  complaining about your use of "reoccurring?"  (See below)
  (No one complained.)

  The word is recur, as in, "I have noticed a recurring
  problem of people's use of the word 'reoccur.'"
 
  Regarding your exercise, I suggest the following:
  "We must ensure that this problem does not recur."

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise:

Please help Laurie L. with her question:  "Could you help me with
prepositional phrases? My office is stumped as to whether or not a
sentence is grammatically correct if it begins with a prepositional
phrase.  The example we have is, "Due to heavy rain, the house has
flooding in the basement."

I remember being instructed to never begin a sentence with 'due to'. I
feel the sentence should read: "The house has flooding in the basement
due to heavy rains."  Is it correct both ways?

Also, are words and phrases that are accepted in the English language
also grammatically correct? What I mean is that some people in my
office feel that both sentences are acceptable, but they are not both
grammatically correct."
******

Linda Chambers comments:
(1) There's nothing wrong with beginning a sentence
    with a preposition (basically as the subject),
    such as: To question rules is not necessarily wrong.

(2) The example using "due to" brings up the point that
    it is such a trite, over-used phrase, I'd lose it
    entirely--and go w/ "because," "since," etc.,
    as appropriate.
******

Steve Sorensen comments:

The sentence, "Due to heavy rain, the house has flooding in the
basement" is perfectly correct. I'm no grammar guru, so when I have a
question I use the substitution method. Substitute "Because of" and
you have a sentence with the exact same meaning. According to Webster,
both "due to" and "because of" are two words that function as a single
word, a compound preposition. But if some obscure reason exists for
avoiding them at the beginning of a sentence, I don't know what it is.
I suspect it's one of Miss Thistlebottom's hobgoblins. Although
grammar texts differ on the issue, Fowler's Modern English Usage says,
"the offending usage has indeed become literally a part of the Queen's
English. Due to inability to market their grain, prairie farmers have
been faced... with a shortage of sums...." (Speech from the Throne on
the opening of the Canadian Parliament by Elizabeth II, Oct. 14, 1957.)
If it's good enough for the queen (and presumably her speechwriters)
almost a half century ago, it should be good enough for Laurie and
me today.

As for the general rule regarding beginning sentences with
prepositional phrases, I find no rule against it. "With her hat in her
hand, Laurie offered a sincere apology." That sentence begins with 2
prepositional phrases, and if Laurie needed to apologize (although she
doesn't), that would be a good way to do it. I can find hundreds of
good sentences that begin with prepositions.

Incidentally, Laurie says "I remember being instructed to never begin
a sentence with 'due to'." Whoever taught her that fractured an
infinitive. She can correct the misguided grammarian by advising the
person to repair the split infinitive: "I remember being instructed
never to begin...."

Due to the marvelous flexibility of the English language, these
exercises are fun. Thank you.
******

Linda.S.Kleinschmidt comments:

"Due to" which means "owing to" is not generally considered correct
usage. "Due " is an adjective and is correctly used following a
linking verb or as a modifier of a noun :

Ex:  The note is due tomorrow
Ex:   The due date is tomorrow

Use "because of" which is a phrasal preposition that indicates
"cause," or use "on account of" which is closely synonymous in
meaning. 

Ex:  Because of heavy rains, the basement flooded.
Ex:  The basement flooded because of heavy rains.
Ex:  On account of the heavy rains, the basement flooded.

The phrase "due to" is always acceptable when the phrase functions as
a predicate adjective (His hesitancy was due to fear); however, when
used as a prepositional phrase, " due to" is considered objectionable
by many, "He hesitated due to fear."  Still, the phrase is often seen
in common use.  It is considered to be colloquially acceptable.
******

My comments:

Oops!!!!  Please make this correction to last week's answer for
sentence #3

3. Our company filed all its memos. (Company is singular.)

Thanks to those who pointed this out to me.

*********************************************************

"There is no such thing as a non-working mother." (Hester Mundis)





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Tip #256: Discriminate between words that sound alike but have
different meanings.  Here are some "homophones," words with similar
pronunciations and different meanings. 

  Elicit (to draw or bring out)
  Illicit (illegal)

  Cite (to quote)
  Sight (vision)
  Site (position, place)

  Taught (past tense of "teach")
  Taut (tight)

  Capital (seat of government)
  Capitol (building in which a legislative body meets)

(If you are interested in increasing your vocabulary skills and
learning how English words were made from Greek and Latin roots,
please see my reading workbook, How to Improve Your Business Reading
Skills.)

*********************************************************

Please correct the errors in agreement:

1. John, besides the Smiths, want two tickets to the game.
2. Rachel and Guy, no less than Jeff, seems anxious to
   hear the results of the exam.
3. The sound of the bells always please me.
4. In the back of the room sits many of my friends.

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise:  What are your comments to the following
comment?  Is there a difference between the word "recur" and
"reoccur?"

Chris Greene comments:
  I haven't been paying attention, but have people
  been complaining about your use of "reoccurring?"
  (See below)  (No one complained.)

  The word is recur, as in, "I have noticed a recurring
  problem of people's use of the word 'reoccur.'"
  Regarding your exercise, I suggest the following: "We
  must ensure that this problem does not recur."
******

Victoria Macdonald comments:
  Merriam-Webster's Word for the Wise states," A
  listener asked which verb is preferable: the
  two-syllable "recur" or the three-syllable "reoccur"?
  It depends on what you're trying to say. Although a
  few usage commentators criticize reoccur as
  unnecessary, reoccur and recur (as well as their noun
  forms, reoccurrence and recurrence) can be
  distinguished from one another, and both can be
  useful in speech and writing.

  Reoccur is most often used in a very basic way;
  it simply tells you that something has happened
  again. Recur and recurrence go beyond that core
  meaning, suggesting that the repetition is not just
  a one-shot deal, but that it happens (or has happened)
  periodically or frequently.
******

Darlene Connor comments: 
  Reoccur is used to suggest a one-time repetition,
  whereas recur suggests repetition more than once,
  usually according to a fixed schedule, as in "the
  recurring phases of the moon," although it can also
  apply to a one-time repetition.
******

Joyce Oldham comments: 
  In your March 21 writing tips appeared the following:
  Linda Chambers comments:

  (1) There's nothing wrong with beginning a sentence
  with a preposition (basically as the subject),  such
  as: To question rules is not necessarily wrong.

  I agree there is nothing wrong with beginning a
  sentence with a preposition such as "Due to...."
  However, if I remember my training correctly, her
  example is not a preposition, but is an infinitive
  which is a verbal noun.  In English, the infinitive
  is composed of two words, to + verb; to love, to walk,
  to enjoy, to be. When you look up a verb in the
  dictionary you find it without the to. This form is
  called the dictionary form; love, walk, enjoy, be.

  The infinitive is a verbal noun; it is the name of
  the action of the verb. ... Infinitives can be active
  or passive in voice; they can be present, perfect,
  or future in tense."
*******

Paul Martin comments:
  Following up on comments from other readers about
  misused phrases, perhaps you can forward the
  following two examples of redundancies to the
  distribution list:

  1. Past experience - all experience is past.
  2. Plan ahead - all planning is done ahead of time.

  Does anyone else have others that are often misused???

*********************************************************

"When ideas fail, words come in very handy."  (Goethe)





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Tip #257:  Effective social and business correspondence adhere to the
following:

  * Get to the point
  * Present facts logically
  * Sound friendly without being insincere
  * Use concrete, specific words
  * Avoid bias and prejudice
  * Understand the readers' needs and interests

*********************************************************

Rewrite the following sentences so they get to the point:

1. Replying to yours of the 24th, we are pleased to
   enclose herewith the information you requested.
2. It is believed that prices will increase.
3. The telephone sales reps are equipped by the company
   with computer-based tools that serve to remind reps to
   ask questions about the kinds of uses that will me
   made of new products.

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise:  Please correct the errors in agreement:

1. John, besides the Smiths, want two tickets to the game.
2. Rachel and Guy, no less than Jeff, seems anxious to
   hear the results of the exam.
3. The sound of the bells always please me.
4. In the back of the room sits many of my friends.
********

Answers:
1. John, besides the Smiths, wants two tickets to
   the game.
2. Rachel and Guy, no less than Jeff, seem anxious to
   hear the results of the exam.
3. The sound of the bells always pleases me.
4. In the back of the room sit many of my friends.
*********

Linda Gebaroff comments:  Well now that you ask.....Pet peeves in
grammar:
        "Irregardless of..."
This is one of my pet peeves (this and not using spell check), and I
cringe whenever I hear anyone say it. I'd be interested in hearing
some of your other readers' pet peeves.
*******

A pet peeve: Gale Driscoll comments:  A staff member is attending
training, or is attending a class.  Why do so many professionals like
to say "So and so is attending a training class"?  What other kind of
class is there?
*******

Another pet peeve:  Yossi D. comments: Repeat again is one of my
favorites. Of course, when referring to the second, third or higher
repetition of something "repeat again" is fine, but it is often used
to refer to the first repetition, which is clearly redundant.
*******

In a similar vein, am I the only one bothered by phrases like "cold
temperatures" and "expensive prices?"

*********************************************************

The examples you use so often relate to issues that arise regularly in
my office. Thanks. ~~ Cathey

*********************************************************

"Success is 99 percent failure."  (Soichiro Honda, founder of Honda
Motor Corp.)





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Tip #258:  How much do you need to write about your subject, and what
do your readers need to know?  The scope and meaning of your topic
depends on how informed your audience is and whether the information
presented is essential to the topic.  Delete any information that does
not support your main points.

*********************************************************

Change each "not" phrase into one word that means the same thing:

1. Dan announced his reports were not effective because
   he could not use his usual computer program.
2. Because Rose failed to notice her staff members were
   not happy, she faced a production crisis not unlike
   the one that had occurred the week before.
3. Not many people attended the task force meeting:  a
   situation that does not occur often.

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise: 
Rewrite the following sentences so they get to the point:

1. Replying to yours of the 24th, we are pleased to
   enclose herewith the information you requested.
2. It is believed that prices will increase.
3. The telephone sales reps are equipped by the
   company with computer-based tools that serve to
   remind reps to ask questions about the kinds of
   uses that will me made of new products.
*******

Jill Terry's answers:

1. The information you requested on the 24th is
   enclosed.  OR  We are pleased to enclose the
   information you requested on the 24th.
2. Prices will increase. OR  Experts believe prices
   will increase.
3. The computer-based tools provided to telephone
   sales reps remind them to ask questions about
   new product uses.
********

Y. David's answers:

1. Enclosed please find the information you
   requested. (If this is official business
   correspondence, the letter of the 24th should
   be listed as a reference,)
2. Prices will likely increase.   Or A price increase
   is likely.
3. When dealing new products, the telephone sales
   reps use computerized checklists to help determine
   the needs of potential customers.
*********************************************************

Pet Peeves:

Suzanne's pet peeve:

1. The "is, is" construct, always heard in oral sentences
   such as, "What puzzles me is, is that he used the wrong
   map."  Or, "The fact of the matter is, is he found the
   place anyway." The phrase is simply "the fact of the
   matter," not "the fact of the matter is."  (The "is,
   is" often is spoken very quickly, sounding like a
   single word, "iziz.")

2. "Calm winds," used frequently in weather reports.

My dear late grandfather's favorite, one he hung onto even after a
debilitating stroke, was the word "often" with a pronounced "t." He
was an engineer and an editor, and schooled his family strictly to
pronounce that word "offen."
*********

Judy Anger's pet peeve:  "Go ahead."
********

Camille Dulaney comments: 
Great tips and very interesting pet peeves?  May I add a few pet
peeves of my own?  In my organization, the misuse of "utilize"
is rampant.  Also, replacing "about" or "related to" with
"around" is a new fad.  People have discussions "around" the
due dates for a project and set guidelines "around" the use of
the corporate credit card.  Lastly, people never "work
together" anymore -- they "partner" on everything!
**********

Jill Terry comments:
Note to the person who submitted this:  In a
similar vein, am I the only one bothered by phrases like "cold
temperatures" and "expensive prices?"  I fail to see what's wrong with
those phrases.  Not all temperatures are cold, so the adjective seems
perfectly reasonable.  All merchandise has a price but some of those
prices are low, some are reasonable, and some are expensive. 
Adjectives describe nouns and that is clearly what they're doing
here.
**********

Jackie A. comments:  Why do so many intelligent, experienced people
use "pacific" instead of "specific"?  And how many times do you see
"effect" used where "affect" is the appropriate word, or vice versa?

*********************************************************

"Much unhappiness has come into the world because of bewilderment and
things left unsaid."  (Feodor Dostoyevsky)





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Tip #259: What is the difference between "credible" and "creditable?" 
At one time they meant the same thing, but that has changed. 
"Credible" means "believable" and "creditable stands for "deserving of
credit or praise."  So, you can be a credible and creditable person.

*********************************************************

Jeanne Hindman asked these questions:
 1. Which is correct?
    Kirkwood was the first college I attended.
    OR
    Kirkwood is the first college I attended.

 2. What trick do you have to remember when to use:
    ensure....assure....insure.   The dictionary
    definitions are similar.

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise: 
Change each "not" phrase into one word that means the same thing:

1. Dan announced his reports were not effective because
   he could not use his usual computer program.
2. Because Rose failed to notice her staff members were
   not happy, she faced a production crisis not unlike
   the one that had occurred the week before.
3. Not many people attended the task force meeting:  a
   situation that does not occur often.
**********

Suggested answers:

1. Dan announced his reports were different because
   he was unable to use his usual computer program.
2. Because Rose failed to notice her staff members were
   unhappy, she faced a production crisis like one that
   had occurred last week.
3. Few people attended the task force meeting:  a
   situation that rarely occurs.

*********************************************************

Pet Peeves:

Julie K. comments: The majority of people I know have forgotten the
existence of adverbs.  I estimate that at least sixty percent say,
"Drive safe" or "We should
leave quick."

P.S. I agree with "Jackie A" that it is irritating to hear "pacific"
instead of "specific," however, a friend of mine has difficulties with
the pronunciation of words like "specific." She practically refuses to
say the word.
**********

Carol Luers Eyman comments: I have started to see writers who mean
"prospective" use "perspective" instead, as in "I sent the brochure to
perspective clients."
**********

David Collins comments: My pet peeve is the word "Illinois" pronounced
"Illinoise"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
**********

Diane.Anziano comments: I have to agree on the comment on "cold
temperatures"; however, "expensive prices" just doesn't sound correct
to me.  An item can be expensive; a price is either high, low or
reasonable.
*********

Victoria.Macdonald comments: My pet peeve?  "Impactful."
*********

Mike Jones comments:  This is my first week to receive your writing
tips. Thoroughly enjoyed them and look forward to next week. My pet
peeve...the use of the phrase 'First Annual...' An event is not an
annual event until it is held the second time, which would mean it
is the First and then the Second Annual.
*********

Y.D. comments: If the pet peeves thread is expanding to
pronunciations, I'd like to add a couple. These are especially
poignant for me since, along with everyone else who mispronounced
them, they were uttered by persons who should certainly have known
better.

1. Height pronounced as heigt-th - I had a math professor
   in college who did this.
2. Nucular (instead of nuclear) -Jimmy Carter did this,
   and he was a nuclear engineer by training.

*********************************************************

"Age is not important unless you're a cheese."  (Helen Hayes, actor)
*************************************************************



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Tip #260:  A good piece of advice from How to Take the Fog Out of
Writing, by Gunning and Mueller, is to play a game called "Chop It" at
least once a week for 20 minutes with a group or alone.  The rules are
to find any writing with too many words and get rid of the words that
are useless. Then rewrite the same thought in fewer words.

*********************************************************

Play "Chop It" with the following.  Get rid of any useless
information:

"In order to keep you informed of the results of the sales meeting
held on  February 10 to consider ways and means of reducing the cost
of the proposed spring sales campaign, we are submitting herewith a
brief resume and the procedure outlined for the cost reduction plan."

*********************************************************

Last week's exercise: 
Jeanne Hindman asked these questions:
#1. Which is correct?
    Kirkwood was the first college I attended.
    OR
    Kirkwood is the first college I attended.

#2  What trick do you have to remember when to use:
    ensure....assure....insure.   The dictionary
    definitions are similar.
********

Brenda Russell comments:  The second option, "Kirkwood is the first
college I attended," is correct if the college is still in existence.
**********

Mayra I. Labrie comments: 
1. My answer is... "Kirkwood is the first college I attended."
   The first one implies that the school is no longer around.
2. My answer is... I put myself on "guard", so to me "Ensure"
   is to give a sense of certainty. "Assure" is to give a sense
   of security.  "Insure" is to give a sense of protection
*********

Linda Kleinschmidt commented about last week's tip: Interestingly
enough, "creditable" has as one of its definitions "being deserving of
commercial credit or capable of being assigned." In this world of
credit bureaus and credit reports and money worthiness, perhaps this
concept is a "technical" use for this word. "Creditable" also has the
connotation of praise, commendation, or worthiness. On the other hand,
"credible" seems to relate more to believability, as in plausible,
reliable, believable.  There's is a slightness of definition
difference here, but in the information age, the difference seems to
be one worth noting. I would probably use "credible" to refer to
aspects that were related to ethics and "creditable" for aspects that
were more technical and documentable.
*********

Steve Sorensen also commented about the tip: See if you think this
answer is credible: Both "credible" and "creditable" are adjectives,
so both should be used to modify nouns (or pronouns).  Both sound
similar, but are not quite synonyms. John has a credible idea. (John
has a believable or convincing idea.) Here, credible is a synonym for
believable, convincing, plausible, and a variety of other adjectives.
John has a creditable idea. (John has a praiseworthy idea.) Here,
creditable is a synonym for admirable, praiseworthy, or commendable.
Another use of "creditable" is as follows: The idea is creditable to
John. (The idea is able to be credited to John, or, John is the source
of that idea.) Here, creditable is used as a predicate adjective,
modifying the subject, idea, and tells the origin of the idea. If this
answer is credible, it is creditable to me.

*********************************************************

Pet Peeves:

Joanne comments: How about "Intergration" instead of "Integration"? 
My employer actually publishes a schedule using the erroneous
spelling. So everyone probably thinks it's right.
*********

John O'Brien comments: the recording on the "L" in Chicago announcing
the next stop as "liberry" at the Harold Washington Library stop.
**********

Connie LeCleir comments: My pet peeve for words is "preventive" and
"preventative". They appear to be interchangeable, but to me it sounds
like an extra syllable inserted! AAHHH!
**********

Jack Williams comments: pet peeve - the increasing use of "supposably"
in place of "supposedly."
*********

In response to Mike Jones' pet peeve, Nancy LaGuardia comments: From a
marketing perspective, "First Annual" is acceptable.  It indicates to
the public that the event will continue to be an annual affair and to
expect it next year.

********************************************************

"Make the most of yourself, for that is all there is of you." (Ralph
Waldo Emerson, 1803-1882, philosopher and writer)





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