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Meat, meat eating, and health

Meat Quick Links:

See "A Cattle Concept," below.

Eating Meat

by
Former cattle owner (I was going to say no bull, but I owned one of those too).

Meat. Should you eat it or not? What about red meat--is it any worse for you than white meat? Let's look at the issues in an intellectually honest way.

  • Meat is high in saturated fat--but it's also high in protein, as well as a host of micronutrients (such as creatine) that are very hard to obtain on a vegetarian diet. On the other hand, a smart and disciplined person has no problem managing a vegetarian diet (I manage such a diet, and have no problem).
  • Meat is low in fiber, but so is water!
  • Meat is a completed protein (contains all the essential proteins your body cannot manufacture). A vegetarian can also get completed protein from such things as beans and rice--which can be made an in a nearly infinite variety.
  • Your digestive tract is too long for a diet high in meat, but your teeth are those of an omnivore--not the flat teeth of a vegetarian creature.
  • On the one hand, meat is wasteful. It takes a great deal of grain and water to produce an animal for consumption. On the other hand, meat is efficient. Meat is a dense source of many hard-to-get nutrients.

 

Looking at these facts, is meat good or bad for you to eat? The answer is yes to both.

Humans do best with some meat in their diets. I eat meat only rarely, myself.

How much is too much? That depends on many individual factors. A rule of thumb is the amount of meat you eat at any meal should be no larger than the palm of your hand (assuming a half-inch thickness). If your stool smells especially bad, that's a hint you may have too much meat in your diet (it could be a hint of something else, so see if cutting back on meat improves the odor within a week or so). In any case, the traditional 12-oz steak is far too large.

Think back to the earliest days of humans. When a hunter caught a rabbit or other small animal, how much meat was there, really? By the time everyone got their share of the meat, there wasn't a whole lot left. As humans got better at making tools and weapons, they began eating more meat. But, the human body has not kept pace with technology (which is one reason computer-generated IRS notices cause so many heart attacks!).

Here's a tip to avoid eating too much meat: Eat meat as a side dish, not the main dish.

Eat mostly vegetables--don't eat highly-processed grains (this includes most flour products) at all. When you do eat meat, trim the fat from it. Never eat anything that is deep-fried, breaded and fried, or cooked in hydrogenated oil (because these fats all go straight to your artery walls, and the breading makes your insulin level skyrocket, which makes your body store fat).

The best time to eat meat? Breakfast or lunch, but not supper. You want to get most of your protein early in the day, and meat is an excellent source of protein. You also want to give your body time to work on that saturated fat before you sleep--while you are awake, conditions are better for burning it off. Most importantly, you want to get that meat through your digestive tract more quickly than eating it late will allow.

A final note on meat. The typical American man has, at the age of 53, six pounds of undigested red meat in his lower bowel. This is gross. The jokes about men and their farting are related to this fact, because that meat is fermenting. In fact, it's loaded with gas-producing bacteria. It forms a thick black tarry substance that many experts believe is a major factor in many illnesses, including bowel and prostate cancers. They believe this because they can look at who has cancer in the tarry group and who has cancer in the group with clean bowels, and they can see a lot more men with tarry bowels have cancer. Eating meat does not make for tarry bowels--eating too much meat or not enough fiber for the amount of meat you do eat causes tarry bowels.

Eat your meat, but skip the pudding. Have an apple, instead.
 

A Cattle Concept

Beef cattle are an important part of the food chain, yet some people will over-emphasize how much grain and water we waste by eating meat instead of grain. First of all, why should you eat much grain? My diet consists of 75% fruits and vegetables. Add beans, eggs, and a few other things and you're pushing 90%. Grains might make up 10% of my diet.

Now, the waste argument is fundamentally sound. The problem is it's typically exaggerated. Cattle are ruminants, which means they can digest things we can't. They turn inedible roughage into highly-digestible meat. This meat is a complete protein source, is a good source of B vitamins, creatine, zinc, and various other nutrients. Two thirds of the land in the world needs forage vegetation to prevent erosion, and only ruminants can harvest that forage. Are you starting to form a mental picture, here? Good!

 

Check out these Meat posters:

 

Check out these cuisine posters:

 

Meat and Potatoes
Meat and Potatoes
17 in. x 11 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted
 
Bucatini all' Amatriciana
Bucatini all' Amatriciana
Hanin, Sophie
10 in. x 12 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted

Pizza Margherita
Pizza Margherita
Hanin, Sophie
10 in. x 12 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted
Ravioli, food posters, cuisine prints, beer posters, food pictures, cuisine posters, wine posters, food images, food photos, cafe photos, cafe posters
Ravioli
Overton, Nancy
11 in. x 14 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted

 

Soupe a L'oignon
Soupe a L'oignon
Hanin, Sophie
10 in. x 12 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted
Bouillabaise
Bouillabaise
Hanin, Sophie
10 in. x 12 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted


Salad Nicoise
Salad Nicoise
Overton, Nancy
11 in. x 14 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted
Princess Cafe, Rochester,Minnesota
Princess Cafe, Rochester,Minnesota
17 in. x 11 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted


Spaten Brau
Spaten Brau
Hohlwein, Ludwig
32 in. x 44 in.
Buy this Giclee Print

Fresh Strawberries
Fresh Strawberries Art Print
Poloson, Kimberly
12 in. x 12 in.
Framed | Mounted
   
Ratatouille Nicoise, food posters, cuisine prints, beer posters, food pictures, cuisine posters, wine posters, food images, food photos
Ratatouille Nicoise
Hanin, Sophie
10 in. x 12 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted
Bouillabaise
Bouillabaise
Hanin, Sophie
10 in. x 12 in.
Buy this Art Print
Framed | Mounted
 

More cuisine posters:

 

 

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